Kay County Detention Center Inmate Search

Kay County Detention Center is a medium security jail which comes under jurisdiction of Kay County, OK. The jail is maintained and operated by sheriffs at Kay County. Offenders from the Police and City jails are transferred to the jail after the paper work is done. They usually stay in the jail, till they are sentenced, acquitted or released on bail. It houses inmate for short period of time serving less than a year jail term. Most of the inmates in Kay County Detention Center are convicted for misdemeanour offenses like drunk-and-drive, fight/assault, theft etc. It provides basic amenities to the inmates like bathroom facility, 3 times meals, education program and TV facility. It also provides work release program and other specialized services to the inmates.

Jail Name :

Kay County Detention Center

Jail Type :

County Jail

Location:

110 South Maple Avenue, Newkirk, Oklahoma, 74647-4025

City:

Newkirk

Postal Code:

74647-4025

State :

Oklahoma (OK)

County:

Kay County

Phone:

580-362-2517

Email:

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Fax:

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Prison beds:

108

Phone Carrier:

City TeleCoin (GTL)

Website:

http://public.esquireempire.com/Kay+County+Jail+in+Newkirk+Oklahoma


Kay County Detention Center Inmate Search

Q. How to find if someone is currently detained at Kay County Detention Center?

  • Kay County Detention Center maintains an online inmate roster where one can find the list of detainees. The list is updated usually once a month. To check the inmate roster please visit Kay County Detention Center Sheriff Department website. Usually the best way is to call the Newkirk police department at 580-362-2517 and enquire about the inmate directly.

Q. What if you are not able to find the inmate in Kay County Detention Center?

  • It means the inmate is transferred to nearby county jail or state prison facility or is released from jail. Check Oklahoma inmate search page for more details on how to search for inmate in Oklahoma.

Q. What are the visitation rules of Kay County Detention Center?

  • Any individual with valid government ID and who isn’t on felony probation is allowed to visit an inmate. Children below 18 years, must be accompanied by a legal guardian. For more information one can call on 580-362-2517.


Kay County Detention Center Visitation Hours:

Sunday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Monday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Wednesday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Thursday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Friday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Saturday

9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

History

The current Kay County Detention Center was built because of overcrowding that led to riots in 2007. The riot caused a jailer to be injured and there was $5 thousand in damages. The new Center was designed and built for $22 million and was opened in 2010.

In 2016, a former Kay County Sheriff's Department administrative assistant was arrested for embezzlement. Melissa Sprueill had access to the inmate trust funds, the money given to inmates to spend at the jail while they are there. Over a five year period, she took over $363 thousand dollars to pay for her gambling habit. The investigation was led by the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and the state auditor. She had used funds from other sources to cover up the removal of funds, including state money that paid for inmates to be housed.

During November 1943, deputies were used to help find escaped prisoners of war from Camp Tonkawa. A riot ensued after several hardcore Nazis executed a fellow prisoner thinking he was a traitor to mother Germany. They had held a kangaroo court and beaten the man with clubs and broken milk jugs. A prison guard killed a few when a riot started. About eight escaped, but were recaptured a few miles from the POW camp. The men responsible for starting the riot and killing the fellow prisoners were taken to Leavenworth and hanged.

Sheriff Syl Ford died from injuries on March 9, 1908. He and two deputies were sneaking up on a man they had to serve a warrant on. While trying to stay hidden, Ford fell and was killed by a train.

On July 21, 1923, Kay County Sheriff's Deputies George Miller and John Middleton found a suspect in a local cafe. They entered and the man saw them. The man pulled a pistol and opened fire. Miller was killed at the cafe. Middleton died the next day from his wounds. The man turned himself in but was acquitted at trial by saying it was self-defense.

On May 6, 1999, Sheriff's Deputy Ian Ewing was responding to call for help from a fellow deputy. The deputy had made a traffic stop on three men suspected in a burglary. Even though his lights and siren were on, Ewing was struck by another vehicle. He died at the scene.

In 1955, the Great Plains saw 46 tornadoes across several states. An F5 tornado hit Blackwell in Kay County. The Sheriff's Department was part of the emergency response. Twenty people were killed in Blackwell, along with 60 buildings being damaged or destroyed.

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Photo of Kay County Detention Center

Kay County Detention Center