Carter County Detention Center Inmate Search

Carter County Detention Center is a medium security jail which comes under jurisdiction of Carter County, KY. The jail is maintained and operated by sheriffs at Carter County. Offenders from the Police and City jails are transferred to the jail after the paper work is done. They usually stay in the jail, till they are sentenced, acquitted or released on bail. It houses inmate for short period of time serving less than a year jail term. Most of the inmates in Carter County Detention Center are convicted for misdemeanour offenses like drunk-and-drive, fight/assault, theft etc. It provides basic amenities to the inmates like bathroom facility, 3 times meals, education program and TV facility. It also provides work release program and other specialized services to the inmates.

Jail Name :

Carter County Detention Center

Jail Type :

County Jail

Location:

13 Crossbar Road, Grayson, Kentucky, 41143

City:

Grayson

Postal Code:

41143

State :

Kentucky (KY)

County:

Carter County

Phone:

606-475-1606

Email:

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Fax:

606-475-1677

Prison beds:

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Phone Carrier:

TelMate Inmate Calling

Website:

http://www.cartercountydetention.com/


Carter County Detention Center Inmate Search

Q. How to find if someone is currently detained at Carter County Detention Center?

  • Carter County Detention Center maintains an online inmate roster where one can find the list of detainees. The list is updated usually once a month. To check the inmate roster please visit Carter County Detention Center Sheriff Department website. Usually the best way is to call the Grayson police department at 606-475-1606 and enquire about the inmate directly.

Q. What if you are not able to find the inmate in Carter County Detention Center?

  • It means the inmate is transferred to nearby county jail or state prison facility or is released from jail. Check Kentucky inmate search page for more details on how to search for inmate in Kentucky.

Q. What are the visitation rules of Carter County Detention Center?

  • Any individual with valid government ID and who isn’t on felony probation is allowed to visit an inmate. Children below 18 years, must be accompanied by a legal guardian. For more information one can call on 606-475-1606.


Carter County Detention Center Visitation Hours:

Sunday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Monday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Wednesday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Thursday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Friday

7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Saturday

9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

History

As with many places in the area during and after the Civil War, Carter County has a history with the partisanship the war brought. The violence after the Civil War was still a part of the county for a while, but the state government was able to help when it was a need. The Underwood War left a mark in the area with several of the violent participants ending up in the jail. The Carter County participation was as an area usually seen as a safe haven. In 1877, Governor McCreary sent men to aide the sheriff and several were arrested peacefully. Sadly, this only brought peace for a short while. It took several more years for the unrest to settle.

In 1905, Willard, Kentucky saw six men rob the local bank. Charlie and Steve Stamper, known local criminals, set up a plan to rob the plan with four other men. The four men went by aliases and knew explosives when robbing banks. Their names people knew them by were Tom Hall, J.W. Wood, Thomas Brown, and J.D. Roderick. The four were on the run because of robbing a local post office. The men blew the outer door in a spectacular fashion, which brought guards. The inner door was cause for them to run from a fight with the people wanting to protect their money. They ran via a train, but were caught. Two were to die and four went to jail for their troubles.

The last to talk about was even part of a poem. Austin Porter was a local teacher that got into an argument Charlotte “Lottie” Porter in 1892. Lies were told by a student to Lottie to break them up. The argument became bad and Austin had a knife to end the argument. Austin went to jail in Carter County, but a lynch mob came in a few weeks and left him for dead from a tree. Elijah Adams wrote a ballad about the murder called The Murder of Lottie Yates.

The mines and the railroad both brought violence, but none were notable. There were strikes, some that had a basis in ethnicity, but never for long. The police were always able to contain the threats.

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